Narrative Nonfiction & Memoir

We represent a variety of writers in this burgeoning genre. From New York Times bestselling author Nando Parrado's Miracle in the Andes to Ada Calhoun's St. Marks is Dead, we're proud of a list ranging from the descriptive to the personal. With celebrities like Nick Offerman and Moby, journalists like Allison Bartlett, and memoirists like Michelle Tea and Rita Coolidge, our narrative-nonfiction authors write from the front-lines and the back offices, illuminating with candor and lyrical prose worlds heretofore hidden from view.

A Wide Range

To learn more about the books to your left, roll over their covers with your mouse.

A Wide Range

To learn more about the books to your left, roll over their covers with your mouse.

Nick Offerman

Gumption

Dutton/Penguin Group

To millions of people, Nick Offerman is America. Both Nick and his character, Ron Swanson, are known for their humor and patriotism in equal measure. After the great success of his autobiography, Paddle Your Own Canoe, Offerman now focuses on the lives of those who inspired him. From George Washington to Willie Nelson, he describes twenty-one heroic figures and why they inspire in him such great meaning. The subject matter will also allow Offerman to expound upon his favorite topics—such as religion, politics, woodworking and handcrafting, agriculture, creativity, philosophy, fashion, and, of course, meat.

Sulome Anderson

The Hostage's Daughter: A Memoir of Family, Madness, and the Middle East

Dey Street / HarperCollins

In this gripping blend of reportage, memoir, and analysis, a journalist and daughter of one of the world’s most famous hostages, Terry Anderson, takes an intimate look at her father’s captivity during the Lebanese Hostage Crisis and the ensuing political firestorm on both her family and the United States—as well as the far-reaching implications of those events on Middle Eastern politics today. Her work has appeared in New York Magazine, Vice, The Atlantic, Foreign Policy, and Vox.

Michelle Tea

How to Grow Up

Plume/Penguin Group

A gutsy, wise memoir-in-essays from a writer praised as “impossible to put down” by People magazine.  At once heartwarming and darkly comic, How to Grow Up proves that the road less traveled may be a difficult one, but if you embrace life’s uncertainty and dust yourself off after every screw up, slowly but surely you just might make it to adulthood.  Tea, who is the founder of the literary non-profit Radar and the imprint Sister Spit at City Lights, has been a longtime indie author. This book has gotten early rave reviews from Elle and Mother Jones, and had a first serial excerpt in Marie Claire.


Ada Calhoun

Wedding Toasts I'll Never Give

W. W. Norton & Company

In Wedding Toasts I’ll Never Give, Ada Calhoun, acclaimed for her provocative essays in the New York Times Modern Love and Lives columns, presents an unflinching but also loving portrait of her own marriage, opening a long-overdue conversation about the institution. Ada is the author of the narrative history St. Marks Is Dead and her work has appeared in New York magazine and the New York Post.

Moby

Porcelain

Penguin Press

From one of the most interesting and iconic musicians of our time, Porcelain is a piercingly tender, funny, and harrowing account of Moby’s path from suburban poverty and alienation to a life of beauty, squalor and unlikely success out of the NYC club scene of the late '80s and '90s. This portrait of the young singer-songwriter, musician, and DJ whose records have sold 20 million worldwide, Porcelain is a masterpiece in its own right, capturing not just a scene but an age, and something timeless about the human condition.

Claudia Rowe

The Spider and the Fly

Dey Street/HarperCollins

In 1998, young reporter Claudia Rowe was writing for the New York Times in Poughkeepsie, New York, when police discovered the bodies of eight women stashed in the attic by Kendall Francois, a polite twenty-seven-year-old college student. After Francois confessed, Rowe and the serial killer began a dizzying four-year conversation about cruelty, compassion, and control. In this spellbinding combination of memoir and psychological suspense (which Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn calls “a must-read”), Rowe chronicles her connection with a convicted serial killer and her search to understand the darkness inside all of us.